One of the most grown-up review sites around

2019
51,000 reviews
and more.. and still writing ...

Search MusicWeb Here

     
  
 

 

International mailing


  Founder: Len Mullenger             Senior Editor: John Quinn               Contact Seen and Heard here  

Some items
to consider

TROUBADISC

colourful imaginative harmony
Renate Eggebrecht violin


Leticia Gómez-Tagle
Chopin, Liszt, Scarlatti


Guillaume LEKEU


Book 1 Book 2 Book3
Mota The Triptych: -Website



Acte Prealable returns
with New Releases


Superior performance


Shostakovich 6&7 Nelsons
Notable


Verdi Requiem Thielemann


Marianna Henriksson
An outstanding recital


Arnold Bax
Be converted


this terrific disc


John Buckley
one of my major discoveries


François-Xavier Roth
A game-changing Mahler 3

........................................

Bryden Thomson


Symphonies


Vaughan Williams Concertos


RVW Orchestral

 

REVIEW Plain text for smartphones & printers

Support us financially by purchasing this from

Franz SCHUBERT (1797-1828)
Arpeggione Sonata, D821 [25:40]
Introduction and variations on an original theme, D968A (arr. A. Hulshoff and A. Frolich) [12:05]
Lieder arrangements for cello and piano
Alexander Hülshoff (cello); Andreas Frölich (piano)
rec. 2013, Schloss Engers, Neuwied, Germany
OEHMS CLASSICS OC1818 [65:10]

Schubert didn’t write any music for solo cello, or cello and piano, but this disc handily collects 75 minutes of music which works well on the instrument. The Arpeggione Sonata is now very familiar as part of the viola and cello repertoires, and there’s also a theme and variations (date unknown) of which Piatigorsky commissioned a cello transcription. The other ten tracks draw from the biggest and richest part of Schubert’s work: the songs.

We get two songs from Schwanengesang, one from Die schöne Müllerin, and the very famous “Wanderer” and “Trout”. I like the concept of this album, and I love all the music. What I do not like is the sound of Alexander Hülshoff’s cello. Without knowing how much this cello sound is in his control, it’s hard to judge the performances. Hülshoff has great rapport with the pianist, Andreas Frölich, and together they have an impeccable knack for the right pacing. The songs flow as naturally as they would with a great voice. The two performers, by the way, are responsible for the very good arrangements.

That said, something about Hülshoff’s cello grates on my ears, and made it impossible for me to listen to this in one sitting. Maybe it’s the vibrato, which tends to be wide and “wobbly”. Maybe it’s the slightly nasal tone, reminiscent of Maria Kliegel. The cello maker and year are not mentioned in the booklet. Maybe it’s the recording venue, a 1700s castle, although I find that unlikely given how well the piano sound comes across.

This is a difficult review to write. Everything about this CD should be recommendable — the sound, the arrangements, the choice of music — except I just cannot abide the rather unpleasant timbre of Hülshoff’s cello ... or cello playing. Listen to sample clips before you buy.

Brian Reinhart

Contents List
Arrangements by the composer or performers
An die Musik, D. 547
Nacht und Träume, D. 827
Heidenröslein, D. 257
Der Wanderer, D. 493
Die Forelle, D. 550
Am Meer, D. 957 No. 12
Lied der Mignon D. 877 No. 4
Der Neugierige, D. 795 No. 6
Du bist die Ruh, D. 776
Ständchen, D. 957 No. 4

 

 



We are currently offering in excess of 51,000 reviews


Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and keep us afloat

 

New Releases

Naxos Classical


Nimbus Podcast


Obtain 10% discount



Special offer 50% off
15CDs £83 incl. postage

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
(THE Polish label)
Altus 10% off
Atoll 10% off
CRD 10% off
Hallé 10% off
Lyrita 10% off
Nimbus 10% off
Nimbus Alliance
Prima voce 10% off
Red Priest 10% off
Retrospective 10% off
Saydisc 10% off
Sterling 10% off


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample

Sample: See what you will get

Editorial Board
MusicWeb International
Founding Editor
   
Rob Barnett
Editor in Chief
John Quinn
Seen & Heard
Editor Emeritus
   Bill Kenny
MusicWeb Webmaster
   David Barker
Postmaster
Jonathan Woolf
MusicWeb Founder
   Len Mullenger