One of the most grown-up review sites around

2021
55,946 reviews
and more.. and still writing ...

Search MusicWeb Here

     
  
 







International mailing


 
Founder: Len Mullenger                                    Editor in Chief:John Quinn             

Some items
to consider

 

paid for
advertisements



TROUBADISC

100th birthday of Mieczyslaw Weinberg on December 8, 2019.
Renate Eggbrecht has recorded all 3 violin Sonatas


FOGHORN Classics


Mozart Brahms
Clarinet Quintets


Falckenhagen Flute Concertos
www.emecdiscos.com


www.emecdiscos.com


Eugène Ysaÿe: Violin Discoveries

 

new releases


 


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample

Sample: See what you will get

Editorial Board
MusicWeb International
Founding Editor
   
Rob Barnett
Editor in Chief
John Quinn
Seen & Heard
Editor Emeritus
   Bill Kenny
MusicWeb Webmaster
   David Barker
Postmaster
Jonathan Woolf
MusicWeb Founder
   Len Mullenger

 

Discs for review may be sent to:
Jonathan Woolf
76 Lushes Road
Loughton
Essex IG10 3QB
United Kingdom
Ph. 020 8418 0616
jonathan_woolf@yahoo.co.uk


 

REVIEW Plain text for smartphones & printers


Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and keep us afloat

 

New Releases

Naxos Classical


Click to see New Releases
Get 10% off using code musicweb10

 


Obtain 10% discount

Recordings of the Month

September


Witold MALISZEWSKI
Symphonic Works


Frederico Mompou


Extraordinary Music for Organ

August

Gunnar Kristinsson Moonbow


Mozart and Contemporaries


Scarlatttis


La clarinette Parisienne

 

Support us financially by purchasing this disc from
Franz SCHUBERT (1797-1828)
Shehori Plays Schubert - Volume 1
Impromptus D935 (1827): No.1 in F minor [11:18]; No.2 in A flat major [7:44]; No.3 in B flat major [9:57]; No.4 in F minor [6:34]
Piano Sonata in B flat major D960 (1828) [39:25]
Mordecai Shehori (piano)
rec. June 1997, New York
CEMBAL D’AMOUR CD168 [75:06]

Mordecai Shehori opens the F minor Impromptu in a very particular way. There’s something latent, something provisional about it. There’s none of the brimming romanticism of Curzon or Schnabel about this playing; instead a more reflective introspection suffuses the music, something more akin to Kempff’s aesthetic. This is made explicit when one considers Shehori’s chordal playing which is not at all an opportunity for brio. The rubati add to the sense of reserve, of fluctuation; there’s less overt flow therefore from Shehori, but there is a tremendous sense of tonal refinement.
 
Again the A flat major reinforces one’s perception that Shehori is taking a measured, unheroic look at the Impromptus, seeing them, as it were, in the round rather than in terms of isolation. He allows himself a little more time in this one, phrasing therefore with greater breadth. The playing doesn’t explore the expressive current as deeply as Schnabel, nor is it as vital as Kempff, but it has its own sense of time, and its own integrity. Shehori cleaves closest to Schnabel in the B flat major. His rhythms are just a bit less biting than Schnabel’s but he remains affectionate and well-sprung and a world away from Kempff’s more skittish approach. The F minor is also engagingly realised though without, quite, the wit that Curzon finds at a similar tempo.
 
He couples the D935 set with the B flat major Sonata, composed a year later. He sets a fine series of tempi, avoiding the monumentality of Richter’s opening movement, its Brucknerian breadth, but also not acquiescing in the faster tempos of, say, Curzon in 1970 or Sergio Fiorentino in 1994. Shehori’s phrasing remains powerfully but flexibly conceived. The first movement B section is appropriately extrovert, and he plays the slow movement with un-sententious gravity. He takes excellently judged tempi in the Scherzo and the finale. The contours of the sonata emerge in splendid proportion; the music is unselfconsciously projected. Shehori’s technique is first-class.
 
These recordings were made back in June 1997, on separate days. There’s nothing about the music in the notes; but Shehori is not on a crusade here, as one feels that he is sometimes is with Chopin. I much prefer his Schubert, which enshrines musicianship of integrity, purpose and sensitivity.
 
Jonathan Woolf