Hungarian cello concertos



Emma Johnson

Newest Releases


Walter Leigh
  Founder: Len Mullenger
Classical Editor: Rob Barnett

Some items
to consider


Free classical music concerts by Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra


British composers

  • Today's leading<br>clarinet-piano duo
  • Stellar debut<br>piano recital
  • Clarinet transcriptions Jonathan Cohler
  • Jonathan Cohler & Claremont Trio
  • French clarinet masterpieces
  • Today's leading<br>clarinet-piano duo


Shostakovich Symphony 10 Nelsons


Verdi Requiem


RECORDING OF THE MONTH
Dvorak Opera Premiere
BEST SELLER


Grieg, Mendelssohn sonatas


REVIEW
Plain text for smartphones & printers


Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Altus
Arcodiva
Atoll
CDAccord
Cameo Classics
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Prima voce
Red Priest
Redcliffe
Retrospective
Sheva
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample

Sample: See what you will get

Editorial Board
MusicWeb
Classical Editor
   
Rob Barnett
Seen & Heard
Editor Emeritus
   Bill Kenny
Editor in Chief
   Stan Metzger
MusicWeb Webmaster
   David Barker
MusicWeb Founder
   Len Mullenger


Support us financially by purchasing this disc from

George GERSHWIN (1898-1937)
Rhapsody in Blue (1924) (orch. Ferde Grofť, 1926) [14:51]
An American in Paris (1928) [18:09]
Concerto in F (1925) [31:48]
London Symphony Orchestra/Andrť Previn (piano and conductor)
rec. June 1971, No.1 Studio, Abbey Road, London
EMI CLASSICS 50999 4 33288 2 [65:13]

Itís a brief welcome back to Previnís 1971 Gershwin album, now reissued yet again, this time in the EMI Masters series complete with a cover mini mock-up of a recording master sheet. Sensibly EMI has retained the LP art as integral to its design. Who would want, even now, to forego Previnís natty look, all denim and cravat, as he stands, defying the known laws of gravity, in the clouds behind a series of stars (but no stripes)?
 
If one can tear oneself away from Previnís sartorial chic, and his Beatle mop, one must acknowledge that his pianism and conducting have both withstood any tests that Time may have thrown their way. Some prefer another, rather more bellicose American pianist-conductor in this repertoire, but Bernsteinís recordings were very different and in many ways complementary. I donít know how much of an advantage it is to be a fine jazz pianist in this repertoire ó as Previn is, and as Bernstein wasnít ó because the very best Concerto and Rhapsody in Blue players include men such as Oscar Levant and Earl Wild, who werenít jazz players either, but were bravura technicians with wonderfully descriptive powers of pianism. Best, I think, not to try too hard ó Bernstein tried increasingly too hard as he aged ó which is why Previnís 1980s Philips Pittsburgh remake is not noticeably inferior to this 1971 LSO performance though it does, perhaps, lack a touch of sparkle.
 
For the Concerto and Rhapsody Previn had his own orchestra, and star instrumentalists; men like Gervase de Peyer and, especially audible in the second movement of the Concerto, the trumpeter Howard Snell. The percussion aura is visceral still, all these years later: the wa-wa brass surprisingly authentic, the ethos idiomatic without being kitsch, with Grofťís orchestration preferred to the original. Previn was sometimes marked down for his supposed sin of urbanity in the Rhapsody, and perhaps more so in the case of the Concerto. I still donít hear it, or understand it. He knew far better than his critics. He certainly doesnít over stress the jazz affiliations of the work, but when you listen to the bizarre games that authentic jazz pianists have played with Gershwinís concertos ó and Iíve heard them indulge five-minute jazz Ďcadenzasí in the middle of them ó I think we should be grateful. If Gershwin had wanted the piano part to sound like a Harlem Stride performance he would have, in Jean-Luc Picardís words, made it so.
 
Previnís An American in Paris retains its glitter and colour and vibrancy. Drama married to felicity will always score highly; characterisation allied to technical sophistication, too. Add to that a splendid Christopher Bishop/Christopher Parker production and you have full value for money.
 
Sensitive, when required, and dramatic when need be, Previn still cuts the mustard in this repertoire.
 
Jonathan Woolf