Aureole etc.




Golden Age singers

Nimbus on-line




Faure songs
Charlotte de Rothschild (soprano);

  Founder: Len Mullenger
Classical Editor: Rob Barnett

Some items
to consider


New App by the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra for iOS and Android!

Schumann Symphonies Rattle


Complete Brahms
Bargain price

 

REVIEW
Plain text for smartphones & printers


Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Alto
Arcodiva
Atoll
CDAccord
Cameo Classics
Centaur
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Northern Flowers
Redcliffe
Sheva
Talent
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample

Support us financially by purchasing this disc from
Ludwig van BEETHOVEN (1770-1827)
The Complete Piano Sonatas
Piano sonatas 1-32
Daniel Barenboim (piano)
Bonus: Interview with Daniel Barenboim
Director: Jean-Pierre Ponnelle
rec. 1983-1984, Palais Lobkowitz, Palais Rasumowsky, Palais Kinsky and Schloss Hetzendorff, Vienna.
Picture format: NTSC, 16:9; Sound format: PCM stereo; Region Code: 0 (Worldwide).
EUROARTS 2066424 [714:00]  

Classical DVDs and Blu-Rays come in several varieties. There are the filmed concerts, now commonplace, which are created to provide content to the few "arts" TV channels around the world, then sold on disc to music fans. Some of these are operas, and some are just films of orchestras, ensembles or soloists performing in concert halls. There are also the, now less common, films of artists playing in grand rooms and halls in chateaus or other stately buildings.
 
What do we really expect from them? They can't replace the concert experience, no matter how good your DVD/Blu-Ray player and audio system. At best, just like CDs, they provide a record of a performance, but in a way that documents a specific artist's expressions and emotions. Many of them are simply films of concerts, with little advantage over audio-only versions. Operas are an exception, since there's the staging and the costumes, and, in some cases, inventive camera-work that will get you much closer to the action than if you were in the audience - just as theatre broadcast to cinemas gives you a totally different view of a play than you would see from the cheap seats, or even the front row.
 
I've seen a lot of DVDs and Blu-Rays, and I've been riveted by some, bored by others, and greatly surprised by a handful. I very much like the medium, because they let me approach music differently. However, there are only a handful of optical discs that I've watched more than a couple of times. A classical DVD or Blu-Ray needs to have something special to stay on the top of my pile.
 
There's an intensely visual performance of Takemitsu's From me flows what you call time which is entrancing and creatively staged. There's a film of Purcell's Fairy Queen which I spin every now and then. And there's this luminous set of Beethoven's piano sonatas performed by Daniel Barenboim in a series of recitals in Berlin in 2005. (The latter is also available on CD from Decca, as part of Barenboim's recent "Beethoven for All" series.)
 
The latter are probably the films that I watch the most. Not only do I appreciate the subtly inventive camera work, but the performances are excellent. Each programme - there are eight in all - provides a selection of the sonatas. Watching these films helped me gain a much deeper understanding of Beethoven's piano sonatas, and a better appreciation of Barenboim as an interpreter of them.
 
So, when I heard that EuroArts was releasing a "new" set of Daniel Barenboim performing these works, I was very excited. These were recorded in 1983 and 1984 in four different "palaces" and castles, showing Barenboim at what one might call his middle period. His first recording of the Beethoven sonatas on disc, in his mid-twenties, bore the impetuousness of youth. His later interpretations, such as the mid-1980s cycle for DG, show wisdom acquired through experience. These films are from that period, and catch Barenboim at a stage where he had been playing these works for decades. His performances here are polished and refined, though lacking the sparkle of the 2005 live recordings. Barenboim is generally expressionless as he performs, and, while he gets a bit animated at times, his face betrays very little.
 
The filming is unadventurous. Edits are conservative, there are lots of long shots, and not many showing Barenboim's dazzling finger-work. There is much attention to the surroundings; the buildings are merely the setting for the music, however, and shouldn't be more than that. There are some very long static shots, which are very different from today's MTV-influenced videos.
 
This leads me back to the original question: what does one expect from a film like this? It's got great music - more than 11 hours of it -, an excellent performer, and is a visual record of that performer in his element. But he's really in a studio - albeit a grandiose one - without the spontaneity of the stage, and in many ways it's similar to a film of someone in a recording studio. No one will watch 11+ hours of Beethoven, or even the 200 minutes or more on each disc (Blu-Ray), in a single sitting. Unlike CDs, which have the convenient length of about an hour, optical discs require more of a time commitment. You can dip into them at any point to hear a favorite sonata but then you will end up not hearing them all.
 
Technically, this is another of EuroArts' Recorded Excellence releases, where the company has scanned old 35mm footage to bring it to today's audiences. The restoration is as good as possible. Compared to something filmed in HD today, it's lacking; there's grain and blur, lighting issues and color saturation problems, but they don't distract from the performances. The images are judiciously cropped from 4:3 to 16:9, and you don't really notice the difference.
 
In the end, if you're a fan of Beethoven's piano sonatas, and especially of Daniel Barenboim's performances, you'll want to own this, as there aren't many complete sets on film. I prefer the live recitals because they are more spontaneous, and because each one is a programmatic selection of three or four sonatas, rather than them being in number order. If you're not familiar with Barenboim's recordings of Beethoven's piano sonatas, I strongly recommend you give these a listen - on film or CD. This is a fine document of one of the best performers of Beethoven on piano. In a field with a lot of competition, I find his recordings to be among my favourites. Maybe you will too.  

Kirk McElhearn
Kirk writes about more than just music on his blog Kirkville.

See also reviews of individual volumes (DVD) by Stephen Greenbank: Volumes 2-4 ~~ Volume 5

Masterwork Index: Beethoven sonatas

Experience Classicsonline